Mashery Developer Blog

Curated lovingly by the Mashery Developer Outreach Team

Geek Girls Carrots Maker Party @ Seattle Central Library

Mashed by: @rexstjohn

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Geek Girls Carrots is a collective “get together and make fun things" group focusing on women in STEM originating from Poland and, more recently, spreading to Seattle via event organizer Kamila Stepniowski. 

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Having run into Kamila on numerous occasions around the Seattle maker and hacker community, I was lucky enough to be invited to attend their very first Maker Party event hosted in the Seattle Central Library. Seeing as Intel (Mashery’s parent company) is deeply involved in the maker-community, I brought along a stack of Intel Galileo boards.

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Overall attendance was around 50 local makers and hackers as well as representatives from the Seattle Pacific Science Center and the Jigsaw Renaissance maker space.

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Aside from giving a 7-minute lightning talk, I ran a small “Mashery Challenge” to encourage developers to answer tricky API questions in order to win two Intel Galileo boards. I also manned a table with Galileo boards to discuss the possibilities between Mashery APIs and IOT devices. Some of the APIs I demonstrated included JamBase and Rotten Tomatoes with Node.js.

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Jigsaw Renaissance ran a workshop teaching kids how to build robots using Lego Mindstorms. Budi and his collaborator Richard from Hack-E-Bot have done a fantastic job making technology approachable to kids by creating a teachable robot kit.

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On the second day, people showed off their Hack-E-Bot creations.

imageThe challenge was a success with 17 participants creating around 20 different applications using APIs from Beats, USA Today and JamBase. Budi Mulyo from Jigsaw Renaissance and Sarah Guermond both took home Intel Galileo prototyping boards. 

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While Geek Girls Carrots is a new group to the Seattle region, they are off to a great start and I always enjoy seeing the local community turn up to build fun “stuff” together!

Another Summer of Internship Fun: Wrangling Alpacas and Shaping Schemas

Mashed by: @alexarcel

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So that time has come around again. Time to put up inner tubes and kayaks, shove camping gear into the closet and as for me, I pack up my room and say goodbye to not-so-sunny San Francisco.  The end of summer has arrived, and with it the end of my super-cool-awesome internship at Intel Mashery. It’s been a blast, but again I say goodbye to the illustrious DevO (Developer Outreach) team and leave with a plethora of new experience and knowledge. 

Last summer I spent my time spiffing up the I/O Docs Community Edition, adding support for HTML tags and OAuth 2.0 and updating to Express 3. I also got to try my hand at Intel’s XDK and made a few demo apps. I learned a lot and had so much fun that June 1 saw me packing my bags and heading to San Francisco for another summer at the Mashery office!

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Alex (that’s me) and Neil (@mansilladev) kicking off the Alpaca integration project.

Summer of Open Source: Part 2
This summer I tackled I/O Docs head-on with a new mission and harder challenge in mind: implementing a new schema and taming an alpaca! The alpaca I refer to is of course alpaca.js, a JQuery-based form generator that is packed full of useful and handy tools that the I/O Docs Community Edition was thirsting for. Between implementing this helpful library and bringing in a new schema, I had a busy and fulfilling summer on Mashery’s developer platform team!

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Days later: heavy schema and template contemplation.

The New Schema
The most notable feature added to the I/O Docs Community Edition this summer is undoubtedly the schema update. I/O Docs renders the API information that is contained in the schema; having an understandable and consistent schema is important for users and ease of use. The I/O Docs Enterprise Edition (the one bundled with Mashery’s SaaS portal product) already supported a solid schema that resembles a bit of Google Discovery Document format and JSON schema.. and now the Community Edition has now been updated to accept this schema. Instead of the clunky organization of method-level information in one JSON file and high level API information (auth, base URIs, etc.) in another, all API info is now stored in one JSON file. Variable names have been altered to reflect familiar and easy to understand standards, and the new JSON file composition follows proper JSON formatting. These changes vastly improve I/O Doc’s schema but maintain a familiar structure for easy migration from the now deprecated version.

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Many days later: sporting the hoodies of focus and concentration.

A new object in the schema is “schemas,” an object that contains any request body methods and/or parameters that can be referenced elsewhere in the schema. Both request bodies and references are new features added this summer. Parameters can be referred to in the schemas via a lone “$ref”: “paramName” element in an object. The JSON configuration files have been updated, so you have plenty of examples to follow.

The big updates here improve request body capabilities, long sought after by the open source I/O Docs community. Now parameters or references to parameters can be placed into a “request” object within a method. The parameters placed here will be sent in the request body when a request is made. PUT/POST call request bodies are now ready for action!

In addition, several new types have been added to the I/O Docs Community Edition. Arrays and objects are now a type option when making a POST or PUT call and are quick and easy to set up in the updated schema. There are several examples on the I/O Docs Github site. Because we’ve implemented Alpaca, which supports JSON schema types, you can expect some of our future revs to involved support for these types, including validation!

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Commit and push. Full on Alpaca integration / transformation!

The Alpaca
So, a little bit more on Alpaca. This alpaca.js library is JQuery-based form renderer, supporting fairly complex templating, schema parsing and input validation. While it is not very versatile or easy to use in custom UIs, the tools it brings to the table in form generation are exemplary. Most of my summer was spent tackling this library, and I will remember it fondly. 

The new and improved I/O Docs Community Edition is indeed a new version, and ready for the platform community to put it through it’s paces. It is jam-packed full of features that members of the community have been asking for, and their requests have been acknowledged and answered! The platform/developer community has been great in giving suggestions and pull requests, and this project would not exist without them.

Farewell!
It’s been a great run and great work this summer and I’ll miss it here at Intel Mashery dearly. Living in San Francisco has been a blast and it would not have been the same without the DevO team. It’s been a privilege and a wonderful ride. I’ll miss everyone as I head back to finish school. Thank you so much!

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Delyn (@delynator), Putin (the tiger), myself (@alexarcel) and Sarah-Jane (@sarahjanemorris)

Seattle API Meetup: Ten Reasons Developers Hate Your API

Mashed by: @rexstjohn

When I first started out as Developer Evangelist for Mashery in Seattle it became clear that there was strong demand for an API Meetup yet none existed….so I started one

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Our first talk was presented by John Musser of API Science who gave his acclaimed talk “Ten Reasons Developers Hate Your API.” Attendance was strong and we completely filled the 40-person event space.

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Developers and API architects from several large local companies including Concur, Microsoft and Amazon were in attendance. Looking forward to more succesful API Meetups in Seattle!

Hooking Up with GovHack Down Under

Mashed by: @masheryoz

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On a recent July weekend Mashery took part in what has become an iconic Big Data event in Australia. Over 2 days 1200 hackers in 11 cities across 3 time zones took part, generating hundreds of new ideas to improve life for everyday Australians.

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Welcome to GovHack 2014, quite possibly the largest hackathon in Australian history.
In 2010 the Australian Government declared that:
To promote greater participation in Australia’s democracy, it is committed to open government based on a culture of engagement, built on better access to and use of government held information, and sustained by the innovative use of technology.
From that the Australian Gov 2.0 initiative was born, and in each year since the annual GovHack event has become a catalyst to push more government agencies to release more open data in order to live up to that promise. The event also presents a unique forum for local developers to work with some incredibly rich Australian data sets, which have inspired some amazing new mashups aimed at solving community problems or making government more effective.
Mashery was proud to be a GovHack partner this year. But in addition to attending and handing out awards, we felt we could do more to help attract attendees to the event. The hackathon scene in Australia is pretty nascent compared to the US and Europe, and good hack events can be very hard to find outside of Sydney or Melbourne. So it was a given that a national event like GovHack was going to need to attract first time hackers, especially in regional areas. In order to help get some of the less experienced developers comfortable with hacking APIs - something they would no doubt have to tackle during the event - we put an Aussie twist on an old favorite: The Mashery Challenge. 
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For the first time we ran the challenge as a week long competition online before the event started, administered via Twitter, as a way to encourage Australian developers to think about mashing stuff together while operating under the pressure of a real competition. The jockeying for leaderboard position was intense, with the #1 spot changing over multiple times throughout the week. Not many managed to make it through all the way to the end, but those who persevered were definitely rewarded with the satisfaction of solving some of the hardest puzzles we’ve ever come up with.
When it finally came time to kick off the big event, Mashery was ready to represent! Veteran evangelist @MansillaDev braved a 15 hour flight and even managed to put aside his pathological fear of the deadly Drop Bear to join me down under, where we attended the Melbourne and Canberra events and met a bunch of amazingly inventive and creative teams. 
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Photo by Jordan Wilson-Otto / CC BY

@MansillaDev and @jadacormier at GovHack Melbourne. I’m pretty sure this was Neil about to Google all the things that can kill you in Australia. He didn’t go outside after that.
It may have been run in 11 different cities, but regular video linkups and a constant stream of Twitter updates and jokes helped to ensure there was a sense of collaboration and shared experience between everyone, even if they were on opposite sides of the continent in Perth or Brisbane (only 4000 KM apart, or a quick 47 hour drive through the Outback…)
imagePhoto by Sharen / CC BY
imagePhoto by Jordan Otto-Wilson / CC BY

imagePhoto by Jordan Otto-Wilson / CC BY

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Photo by Brett James / CC BY
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Photo by GovHack Perth / CC BY
It was two super intense days, and in the end over 200 teams created mashups and prototypes. All of which are listed for public viewing and voting.
Some of our favorites included:

'What is Gov (Baby don't hurt me)' which not only wins BEST PROJECT NAME EVER because I know for a fact that it’s in your head now too BUT also happens to be a completely engaging and charming party game that shows how government actually operates. Cut through that red tape to win!

One of the prettier entries, this is a beautifully designed city dashboard for Melbourne residents to see what is happening right now around their city. Video also includes a completely unintentional OK GO homage, so they got that going for them.

Some incredibly poised and impressive year 9 students who created an app to optimize the use of public infrastructure like sports venues, BBQs, and playgrounds. 
Crunching the numbers to prove that immigrants who come to Australia contribute significantly to the overall value of society. Not just a huge hot political issue at the moment, but a truly admirable objective to try and use government data to dispel some of the myths that persist in society today.
So with $70K in prizes up for grabs, which projects took home the awards? Mashery was proud to sponsor the Spirit of GovHack award, which was provided to the team in each city that best exemplified the spirit of GovHack. 
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Spirit of GovHack Canberra winner @MatthewPurcell accepting his award graciously, without mentioning my mysterious phase shifting hand.


But that was only the first round of prizes. The best of various category prizes, and best overall is still to be decided. With so many entries to evaluate that’s going to take some time! But announcements are coming soon. GovHack organizers have a gala red carpet event planned for Aug 10 in which finalists are invited to attend, rub shoulders with the data custodians, and find out who will be the 2014 GovHack champions. 

Hacking for a Cause in LA at the Causathon

Mashed by: @chestondev

Developers teamed with non-profit organizations to create impactful technology solutions last weekend at the Causathon Hack for a Cause hackathon in Santa Monica, CA held at General Assembly. This 24 hour hackathon was organized by Brand Knew, the creative agency and technology accelerator.  

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Brand Knew’s Zach Suchin welcomed attendees and introduced the eleven non-profit organizations during Saturday’s opening ceremonies.  Developer teams were then announced out of a drawing to select their preferred organization for collaboration.

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Once all teams were matched, a huge countdown clock appeared and hacking began. Sponsors were on-site helping developers and awarding prizes.  The prize for the best app using the Mashery API Network: up to (3) Acer 720 Chromebooks.

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After the opening ceremonies, I presented my workshop, “How to Build a Mobile App with the Mashery API Network.” I called on a volunteer, an IOS native developer, to help me build the new Beats Music HTML5 app in Intel XDK.  With my direction, he registered for a Mashery account, obtained his Beats Music API key, made an API call using Beats Music Playground, and built the Beats Music app in Intel XDK. This demonstration was completed in just minutes in front of an audience.

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I also assisted participants with Hacker League, the hackathon management tool used by Causathon, which included help with team formation and design techniques using Hacker League templates. Descriptions of Causathon projects with nicely crafted app screenshots can be found here on Hacker League

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Contestants worked on their non-profit organization apps, and raffle prizes for participants were announced and awarded throughout the night and into the next day.

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The Mashery prize was awarded to the awesome five member team that created “HEART-IT.”

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This penpal app allows users to share photos and e-collages with friends, and send messages to other users and build friendships around the world. The Beats Music and Rotten Tomatoes API were used in this app for users to share their music and movie interest with friends. This team paired with Children Mending Hearts, an organization dedicated to empowering disadvantaged youth through educational and art programs that build empathy and global citizenry.

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I want to thank Russell Meyerowitz and the Brand Knew team for organizing this awesome event.  And thanks to all the participating LA developers and volunteers.

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The Summer of Hacker League

Mashed by: @ajotwani

“Say no to everything, so you can say yes to the one thing.” ~ Richie Norton

With a product like Hacker League that’s loved and used everyday by developers, to hackathon organizers, to just plain hackathon enthusiasts, we’ve been taking a closer look at exactly what would really make the experience better for our Hacker League community.

With Swift’s help, we dug into the Hacker League infrastructure, explored its nooks and crannies, and mapped out what we need to do in the next few months to improve the performance and user experience.

But what’s really cool is that we’ve pulled together some amazing talent to get to work on Hacker League. Today, I would like to share some of the things that we’ve been working on.

Here’s what we’ve been up to

The message we heard loud and clear from the community back when we took over Hacker League was - “Hacker League is awesome; don’t screw it up with a million unnecessary features.” So instead of adding unnecessary features, we’ve spent most of our time simplifying the existing features and improving the usability.

  1. Make the Hackathons page load faster: We’ve rolled out a faster & improved performance of the Hackathons list page, making it easier to quickly find the hackathon you’re looking for.
  2. Make it easier to add a Location to my hackathon: A new redesigned Address/Locaton selector for the “Create new Hackathon" page. It uses the Google Maps API to provide suggested Address, City, State, and Country Suggestions as you type, making it faster for you to create your hackathon and ensuring that the location is in a standard format, making it easier to search and discover.
  3. Give me a Visual Map to help interested developers locate my hackathon: A Map with the chosen address plotted on it is then displayed, assuring organizers that users will be able to find directions using Google Maps.
  4. Make it easier for me to sort/arrange the wiki pages for my hackathon: Ability to reorder/arrange the wiki links on the left side bar. The wiki links on the hackathon details page are now sorted alphabetically, instead of creation date. You can now control the order of the wiki pages simply by adding a page order number in front of the wiki name. This will ensure that they are arranged in the order you want, not the order you may have created them in.
  5. Video embeds - The Hacker League wiki pages now support video embeds, so you can now include YouTube/Vimeo videos right into the wiki itself.
  6. Help me make my hackathon pages look pretty: Introducing Hacker League Markdown Templates. Ready to be used Markdown templates for Overview, Schedule, Location & other popular pages you as an organizer might need to create for your hackathon. All available here on GitHub.
  7. Add Support for BitBucket: You now have a choice to include a link to your GitHub or BitBucket repos on your user profile page.
  8. I want to throw a private, internal hackathon: Hacker League Enterprise is now being used by Intel customers. General Electric used Hacker League Enterprise to run their recent in May at their GE Software headquarters in Northern California.
  9. Plenty of bugs, annoyances, and enhancements (thanks to those of you who posted them on UserVoice)

What’s next

Among many requests we received from you, these two stood out pretty distinctly, and will be rolling out shortly -

  1. Refresh the website design for Hacker League. Make it beautiful and more functional, without losing the simplicity.
  2. Easily search for hackathons by name and location.

This is just a start. We plan to do a ton of work on Hacker League over the next few months. We’re also tapping the expertise of people across Mashery with skills in design, user experience, and front-end web interfaces. With their help, we’re going to build a better Hacker League.

We’re listening

We want to know what new features you’d like, what current features need tweaking, or whatever you’d like to share. If you have ideas, thoughts, suggestions, and requests, we’d be grateful if you’d put them into writing and drop us a note at feedback [at] hackerleague [dot] org, or tweet us at @hackerleague.

We will do our best to keep you well-informed, seek your feedback, and make Hacker League better than it was before. Stay tuned for what’s next, and please keep the feedback coming.

Amit Jotwani (@amit)

Hacker League Community Guy & Front End Developer

OSCON API Challenge in Portland, Oregon

Mashed by: @rexstjohn

OSCON is a major O’Reilly Media conference focusing on open-source technologies which takes place yearly in Portland at the Oregon Convention Center. Mashery came in force this year, bringing an entire team including Jim Ruga, Vivek Chopra, Neil Mansilla, Rex St. John, Rai Phairow and Shobit Agarwal to run our very first OSCON API Challenge. Here is what happened…

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Thousands of software developers attend OSCON to participate in 5-days of workshops and informational sessions such as this year’s talk by Netflix’ Daniel Jacobson on “lessons learned when building APIs for 1000+ devices.” A growing conference, OSCON reported an attendance in the vicinity of 4,000 this year. 

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Mashery, along with parent company Intel, is a strong advocate for the open-source movement and as such have been regular OSCON attendees in years past. Our contributions include I/O Docs Community Edition for creating interactive REST API documentation and our I/O Wraps Client Library Generator.

This year, we thought it would be fantastic to organize our very first OSCON API Challenge. The grand prize? A MakerBot Replicator Mini 3D printer! Other prizes included a Spark Core maker kit, spinning TARDIS toy, PowerUp airplanes and a robotic desk-cleaner. These prizes, along with other schwag, were on display at Mashery’s booth located in the main hall next to Microsoft. 

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The objective of API Challenge is to help developers familiarize themselves with the Mashery API Network in a fun yet challenging manner. Developers streaming past the booth are invited to enter to win the grand prize (pictured above) in exchange for solving a series of increasingly devilish questions within a two day period.

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The more questions you answer, the more “points” you are awarded, the higher up the leaderboard and the better your odd’s of winning the grand prize (or one of several other prizes) improved. The API Challenge tends to cause fierce competition over who can answer the most questions and, many times, we find participants wind up living near the Mashery booth in hopes of getting vital hints they need to proceed. 

The API Challenge drawing occurs on day 2 of OSCON, before we get to that lets talk about some of the other fun activities and projects we encountered starting with open hardware.

imageSome of the fun projects on display included this Arduino-based alligator project which came armed with a light detector and it’s own quirky set of behaviors such as sniffing around and swimming in circles.

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Jim Ruga inspects the alligator. Mashery was initially located in the outside corridor before moving inside the conference center to mingle with more developers.

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Our neighbor Microsoft showed off an Intel Galileo-based piano hack using an embedded version of Windows for devices.

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After two straight days of puzzling, a crowd gathered to hear the winners being announced.

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The very persistent Egle Sigler (@eglute) walked away with the grand prize MakerBot printer. Egle lived and breathed the API Challenge, never straying far from the booth and was rewarded handsomely for her efforts. Congratulations!  Egle also won one of the PowerUp airplanes as well.

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 Jorge wins the Spark Core maker kit. 

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Joshua Crowe accepts the desktop cleaner boron behalf of Peter Bliss (@pblissmtm).

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Steven Lotito (@slowteetoe) wins the Tardis spinner toy.

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Joshua Crowe wins a PowerUp plane (@dolciandjoes).

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Thanks to everyone who participated and showed up to answer challenge questions, we had a fantastic OSCON and saw lots of new activations for a variety of our APIs including ESPN, Beats Music, Sensis, SportsData, Jambase, Klout, USA Today, FoodEssentials and Rotten Tomatoes. Looking forward to next year’s OSCON!

View the full photo set here.

Developers Gather in Kansas City for Hack Midwest

Mashed by: @chestondev

The 24 hour Hack Midwest hackathon took place last weekend in Kansas City at Johnson County Community College. Developers mainly from Kansas and Missouri gathered at the school’s gym and stationed their workspace on its basketball floor surrounded by a huge track. Three teams using the Mashery API Network each won Hack Midwest’s Best Design, Most Entertaining, and the Mashery prize.

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Hack Midwest organizer Michael Gelphman kicked off the Saturday morning opening ceremonies. I presented the Best Use of the Mashery API Network challenge and announced our prize: up to 3 Sparki Arduino powered robots.

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Sponsor representatives from Rdio, MasterCard, Clarify, and Speedy Cash were also on-site presenting challenges. prizes, and providing support to participating developers.  

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Look! It’s Keith Casey

Shortly after, contestants organized their teams and began hacking.  Early in the event, I met a beginner developer eager to learn app development, and in just an hour with my little guidance, she registered for her Active API key and used I/O Docs to make calls, explored the Mashery API Network to obtain her Beats Music API key and built the HTML5 Beats Music App using Intel XDK. Her app accomplishment was impressive and she quickly began work on her next app using the HarperCollins API.

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I later met a four member team addressing problems in medical emergency field.  They built their “KwikER” app to provide users the fastest access to hospital emergency rooms and used the TomTom API to provide hospital locations.  

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Another team took the challenge of developing an app for the Pebble watch.  Their app “R2DJ” allows users to DJ music with other users and provide additional information about music artists such as concerts using the JamBase API.

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The winner of the Mashery prize was awarded to the three member team that created “Racio.” This music trivia game used the Rovi API to supply game questions.  Team members demonstrated their app by having the audience log into and play the game live.  Individuals raced against each other by successfully answering music related questions. The presentation screen displayed players progress through color bars and the first to reach the finish line won. The app experience was fun and intense.

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Two other teams using the Mashery API Network achieved victory.  “Blast Best Buy” won Hack Midwest’s Most Entertaining app.  This app, created by a single developer gamified the shopping experience by placing users in a first person shooter virtual world, firing at products (data pulled from the Best Buy Categories API) and breaking down their contents to provide more detailed product information. Once a product was completely blasted (aka fully explored), users were awarded points. This app brought many smiles to the audience, received a thunderous applause and was definitely a crowd pleaser.

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The Hack Midwest Best Design prize was awarded to an awesome five member team that created “Coder Coupling.” This dating app for programmers used the Yellow Pages API to provide data for possible date locations such as restaurants. It was amazing to see this app’s design evolve throughout the event which resulted in an eighties retro video game look inspired by Pac-Man.

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I want to thank Michael Gelphman and all participating volunteers at Hack Midwest for helping organize this awesome event.

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See more pictures from Hack Midwest here

Seattle Wearables Hackathon @ WeWork

Mashed by: @rexstjohn

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Last weekend (July 12th - 13th), Seattle Wearables Hackathon drew around 100 hackers, designers, developers and business people to the WeWork co-working space in the South Lake Union district of Seattle to hack together “The Next Big Thing” in wearable technology. 

Multiple members of the local hardware startup community including representatives and employees from Intel, Madrona Venture Group, Amazon, Microsoft, Expedia, Boeing and ITT were present to provide guidance and coaching to developers on technical and business problems.  Sponsors included Mashery (an Intel company), PayPal + Braintree, Strata Conference, Hadoop World and O’Reilly Media.

Seattle Wearables Hackathon was the result of planning and collaboration between several local Seattle Meetups and groups including Seattle HackathonsInternet of *BeMyAppHack ThingsSeattle Mobile Developers and SEAWear.

Below are a few select images, view the full gallery here.

Here is how it all went down.

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On day 1, the event kicked off with a rousing welcome by event organizers Hakon Verespej and Alex Day.

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Next up, participants heard pitches from Mashery and PayPal API. In the above picture yours truly explains how Mashery APIs like MapMyFitness can be used to create compelling fitness-related projects using wearable technology. 

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Justin Woo from PayPal demonstrated a fascinating integration for charging people for petting his dog (and the benefits of PayPal’s payment services and APIs).

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A number of ideas and concepts were then pitched to the audience ranging from VR, augmented reality, wearable gloves and more. image

Once the pitches were done, teams formed and the next two days were spent collaborating on a variety of technical projects in WeWork’s main open area. 

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Jigsaw Renaissance brought a hardware supply table to lend developers needed components for their projects. Above, Jigsaw representative Budi Mulyo explaining the finer points of capacitors to Joshua McBroom of Seattle Startup Weekend.

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Michael Strand of General UI built a wearable hat hack involving temperature sensors. Below are an assortment of other interesting projects underway.

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Finally, after a long night of hacking and a few last minute tweaks, the teams presented their finished prototypes.

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First up, Team oneFLEX consisting of Noah Shutty, Josh Rohas and Alex Day present their wearable glove and connected mobile phone solution leveraging Mashery’s ESPN and Rotten Tomatoes APIs.

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Mike Strand showing off his magic hat.

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Team PeePee consisting of Troy Anderson, Desiree Salgado and Fernando Hernandez (www.peepeealert.com) demonstrate a solution for triggering alerts when a diaper becomes wet. They ultimately won Pebble watches from PayPal for their use of the PayPal API.

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Ruby and Oliver from Team Flippin’ Awesome demonstrate a glove-controlled 3D printed car.

Finally, judges from PayPal and Mashery convened to discuss prizes to award for best use of Mashery and PayPal APIs. 

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Team Carify including Amyr Haq, Catherine Hubert and Jenny Chuan took home a Basis fitness tracker for their integration of Mashery API Edmunds.

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Team oneFLEX consisting of Noah Shutty, Josh Rojas and Alex Day took home a Basis fitness band for their integrations of the ESPN and Rotten Tomatoes APIs.

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 Overall this was a fantastic event, it was highly rewarding and inspirational to see the enthusiasm and talent available in the Seattle area for wearable tech! Looking forward to many future events.

 If you are interested in taking part in future events, be sure to join some of these Meetup groups: Seattle HackathonsInternet of *,Hack ThingsSeattle Mobile Developers and SEAWear.

For future IoT/wearable hackathon updates, follow @rexstjohn and @masherydev on Twitter and check out our events calendar at http://dev.mashery.com/events.

 

Mashquatch Survival Hack @ ToorCamp

Mashed by: @rexstjohn

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ToorCamp is a unique hacker camping event which occurs every other year in remote Neah Bay, Washington. As a developer evangelist, ToorCamp interested me because 1,000 or so hackers, makers, engineers and software types make the trip and I wanted to see what it was all about. While I was out there I dressed like a yeti and threw the world’s first “Mashquatch Survival Hack” to challenge these wilderness hackers to show me their best survival projects.

It was a unique experience.

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Some very creative folks show up at ToorCamp including HackerFriendly (pictured above). Last ToorCamp, he built a massive sky-laser which required 3 months to get FAA approval. This year, he focused his energy on Tesla Coils and a highly dangerous “Tesla Cannon.”

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Music is a big part of the event. Many creative music hacks and wearables were on display. In the above image, Jeff Records of OlyMega demonstrates a wearable helmet decorated with flashing lights tied to his DJ rig.

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One of the annual favorite survival hacks comes in the form of “ShadyTel.” ShadyTel is a “real” cellphone and phone network which is constructed on the fly by a group of telephony junkies. By the end of the event, the entire camp is wired for land-line calls and 2G cellphone coverage (including the bathrooms).

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Some of the survival hacks on display included a “Solar Death Ray” like the one above which proved useful for heating frozen chimichangas.

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The above survival hack involved using a radiator, a campfire, the bed of a pick up truck and a hose leading to the ocean to produce a “hot tub.”

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The pickup truck “hot tub.” Unfortunately, the tide was out so these folks had problems filling their tub.

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The Mashquatch enjoying a few minutes in the foam pit between judging survival hacks.

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Franklin Hu demonstrates his solar panel…made from other solar panels (very creative!).

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Ultimately, Franklin won the “Golden Squatch” award for the best overall survival hack for his Solar Death Ray. The Mashquatch is partial to chimichangas in general so it was a slam dunk.

ToorCamp was a real challenge to pull off but I enjoyed myself thoroughly and met numerous influential members of the maker community. 

View the full photo set here.