Mashery Developer Blog

Curated lovingly by the Mashery Developer Outreach Team

Hacking for a Cause in LA at the Causathon

Mashed by: @chestondev

Developers teamed with non-profit organizations to create impactful technology solutions last weekend at the Causathon Hack for a Cause hackathon in Santa Monica, CA held at General Assembly. This 24 hour hackathon was organized by Brand Knew, the creative agency and technology accelerator.  

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Brand Knew’s Zach Suchin welcomed attendees and introduced the eleven non-profit organizations during Saturday’s opening ceremonies.  Developer teams were then announced out of a drawing to select their preferred organization for collaboration.

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Once all teams were matched, a huge countdown clock appeared and hacking began. Sponsors were on-site helping developers and awarding prizes.  The prize for the best app using the Mashery API Network: up to (3) Acer 720 Chromebooks.

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After the opening ceremonies, I presented my workshop, “How to Build a Mobile App with the Mashery API Network.” I called on a volunteer, an IOS native developer, to help me build the new Beats Music HTML5 app in Intel XDK.  With my direction, he registered for a Mashery account, obtained his Beats Music API key, made an API call using Beats Music Playground, and built the Beats Music app in Intel XDK. This demonstration was completed in just minutes in front of an audience.

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I also assisted participants with Hacker League, the hackathon management tool used by Causathon, which included help with team formation and design techniques using Hacker League templates. Descriptions of Causathon projects with nicely crafted app screenshots can be found here on Hacker League

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Contestants worked on their non-profit organization apps, and raffle prizes for participants were announced and awarded throughout the night and into the next day.

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The Mashery prize was awarded to the awesome five member team that created “HEART-IT.”

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This penpal app allows users to share photos and e-collages with friends, and send messages to other users and build friendships around the world. The Beats Music and Rotten Tomatoes API were used in this app for users to share their music and movie interest with friends. This team paired with Children Mending Hearts, an organization dedicated to empowering disadvantaged youth through educational and art programs that build empathy and global citizenry.

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I want to thank Russell Meyerowitz and the Brand Knew team for organizing this awesome event.  And thanks to all the participating LA developers and volunteers.

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The Summer of Hacker League

Mashed by: @ajotwani

“Say no to everything, so you can say yes to the one thing.” ~ Richie Norton

With a product like Hacker League that’s loved and used everyday by developers, to hackathon organizers, to just plain hackathon enthusiasts, we’ve been taking a closer look at exactly what would really make the experience better for our Hacker League community.

With Swift’s help, we dug into the Hacker League infrastructure, explored its nooks and crannies, and mapped out what we need to do in the next few months to improve the performance and user experience.

But what’s really cool is that we’ve pulled together some amazing talent to get to work on Hacker League. Today, I would like to share some of the things that we’ve been working on.

Here’s what we’ve been up to

The message we heard loud and clear from the community back when we took over Hacker League was - “Hacker League is awesome; don’t screw it up with a million unnecessary features.” So instead of adding unnecessary features, we’ve spent most of our time simplifying the existing features and improving the usability.

  1. Make the Hackathons page load faster: We’ve rolled out a faster & improved performance of the Hackathons list page, making it easier to quickly find the hackathon you’re looking for.
  2. Make it easier to add a Location to my hackathon: A new redesigned Address/Locaton selector for the “Create new Hackathon" page. It uses the Google Maps API to provide suggested Address, City, State, and Country Suggestions as you type, making it faster for you to create your hackathon and ensuring that the location is in a standard format, making it easier to search and discover.
  3. Give me a Visual Map to help interested developers locate my hackathon: A Map with the chosen address plotted on it is then displayed, assuring organizers that users will be able to find directions using Google Maps.
  4. Make it easier for me to sort/arrange the wiki pages for my hackathon: Ability to reorder/arrange the wiki links on the left side bar. The wiki links on the hackathon details page are now sorted alphabetically, instead of creation date. You can now control the order of the wiki pages simply by adding a page order number in front of the wiki name. This will ensure that they are arranged in the order you want, not the order you may have created them in.
  5. Video embeds - The Hacker League wiki pages now support video embeds, so you can now include YouTube/Vimeo videos right into the wiki itself.
  6. Help me make my hackathon pages look pretty: Introducing Hacker League Markdown Templates. Ready to be used Markdown templates for Overview, Schedule, Location & other popular pages you as an organizer might need to create for your hackathon. All available here on GitHub.
  7. Add Support for BitBucket: You now have a choice to include a link to your GitHub or BitBucket repos on your user profile page.
  8. I want to throw a private, internal hackathon: Hacker League Enterprise is now being used by Intel customers. General Electric used Hacker League Enterprise to run their recent in May at their GE Software headquarters in Northern California.
  9. Plenty of bugs, annoyances, and enhancements (thanks to those of you who posted them on UserVoice)

What’s next

Among many requests we received from you, these two stood out pretty distinctly, and will be rolling out shortly -

  1. Refresh the website design for Hacker League. Make it beautiful and more functional, without losing the simplicity.
  2. Easily search for hackathons by name and location.

This is just a start. We plan to do a ton of work on Hacker League over the next few months. We’re also tapping the expertise of people across Mashery with skills in design, user experience, and front-end web interfaces. With their help, we’re going to build a better Hacker League.

We’re listening

We want to know what new features you’d like, what current features need tweaking, or whatever you’d like to share. If you have ideas, thoughts, suggestions, and requests, we’d be grateful if you’d put them into writing and drop us a note at feedback [at] hackerleague [dot] org, or tweet us at @hackerleague.

We will do our best to keep you well-informed, seek your feedback, and make Hacker League better than it was before. Stay tuned for what’s next, and please keep the feedback coming.

Amit Jotwani (@amit)

Hacker League Community Guy & Front End Developer

OSCON API Challenge in Portland, Oregon

Mashed by: @rexstjohn

OSCON is a major O’Reilly Media conference focusing on open-source technologies which takes place yearly in Portland at the Oregon Convention Center. Mashery came in force this year, bringing an entire team including Jim Ruga, Vivek Chopra, Neil Mansilla, Rex St. John, Rai Phairow and Shobit Agarwal to run our very first OSCON API Challenge. Here is what happened…

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Thousands of software developers attend OSCON to participate in 5-days of workshops and informational sessions such as this year’s talk by Netflix’ Daniel Jacobson on “lessons learned when building APIs for 1000+ devices.” A growing conference, OSCON reported an attendance in the vicinity of 4,000 this year. 

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Mashery, along with parent company Intel, is a strong advocate for the open-source movement and as such have been regular OSCON attendees in years past. Our contributions include I/O Docs Community Edition for creating interactive REST API documentation and our I/O Wraps Client Library Generator.

This year, we thought it would be fantastic to organize our very first OSCON API Challenge. The grand prize? A MakerBot Replicator Mini 3D printer! Other prizes included a Spark Core maker kit, spinning TARDIS toy, PowerUp airplanes and a robotic desk-cleaner. These prizes, along with other schwag, were on display at Mashery’s booth located in the main hall next to Microsoft. 

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The objective of API Challenge is to help developers familiarize themselves with the Mashery API Network in a fun yet challenging manner. Developers streaming past the booth are invited to enter to win the grand prize (pictured above) in exchange for solving a series of increasingly devilish questions within a two day period.

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The more questions you answer, the more “points” you are awarded, the higher up the leaderboard and the better your odd’s of winning the grand prize (or one of several other prizes) improved. The API Challenge tends to cause fierce competition over who can answer the most questions and, many times, we find participants wind up living near the Mashery booth in hopes of getting vital hints they need to proceed. 

The API Challenge drawing occurs on day 2 of OSCON, before we get to that lets talk about some of the other fun activities and projects we encountered starting with open hardware.

imageSome of the fun projects on display included this Arduino-based alligator project which came armed with a light detector and it’s own quirky set of behaviors such as sniffing around and swimming in circles.

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Jim Ruga inspects the alligator. Mashery was initially located in the outside corridor before moving inside the conference center to mingle with more developers.

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Our neighbor Microsoft showed off an Intel Galileo-based piano hack using an embedded version of Windows for devices.

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After two straight days of puzzling, a crowd gathered to hear the winners being announced.

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The very persistent Egle Sigler (@eglute) walked away with the grand prize MakerBot printer. Egle lived and breathed the API Challenge, never straying far from the booth and was rewarded handsomely for her efforts. Congratulations!  Egle also won one of the PowerUp airplanes as well.

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 Jorge wins the Spark Core maker kit. 

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Joshua Crowe accepts the desktop cleaner boron behalf of Peter Bliss (@pblissmtm).

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Steven Lotito (@slowteetoe) wins the Tardis spinner toy.

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Joshua Crowe wins a PowerUp plane (@dolciandjoes).

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Thanks to everyone who participated and showed up to answer challenge questions, we had a fantastic OSCON and saw lots of new activations for a variety of our APIs including ESPN, Beats Music, Sensis, SportsData, Jambase, Klout, USA Today, FoodEssentials and Rotten Tomatoes. Looking forward to next year’s OSCON!

View the full photo set here.

Developers Gather in Kansas City for Hack Midwest

Mashed by: @chestondev

The 24 hour Hack Midwest hackathon took place last weekend in Kansas City at Johnson County Community College. Developers mainly from Kansas and Missouri gathered at the school’s gym and stationed their workspace on its basketball floor surrounded by a huge track. Three teams using the Mashery API Network each won Hack Midwest’s Best Design, Most Entertaining, and the Mashery prize.

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Hack Midwest organizer Michael Gelphman kicked off the Saturday morning opening ceremonies. I presented the Best Use of the Mashery API Network challenge and announced our prize: up to 3 Sparki Arduino powered robots.

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Sponsor representatives from Rdio, MasterCard, Clarify, and Speedy Cash were also on-site presenting challenges. prizes, and providing support to participating developers.  

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Look! It’s Keith Casey

Shortly after, contestants organized their teams and began hacking.  Early in the event, I met a beginner developer eager to learn app development, and in just an hour with my little guidance, she registered for her Active API key and used I/O Docs to make calls, explored the Mashery API Network to obtain her Beats Music API key and built the HTML5 Beats Music App using Intel XDK. Her app accomplishment was impressive and she quickly began work on her next app using the HarperCollins API.

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I later met a four member team addressing problems in medical emergency field.  They built their “KwikER” app to provide users the fastest access to hospital emergency rooms and used the TomTom API to provide hospital locations.  

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Another team took the challenge of developing an app for the Pebble watch.  Their app “R2DJ” allows users to DJ music with other users and provide additional information about music artists such as concerts using the JamBase API.

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The winner of the Mashery prize was awarded to the three member team that created “Racio.” This music trivia game used the Rovi API to supply game questions.  Team members demonstrated their app by having the audience log into and play the game live.  Individuals raced against each other by successfully answering music related questions. The presentation screen displayed players progress through color bars and the first to reach the finish line won. The app experience was fun and intense.

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Two other teams using the Mashery API Network achieved victory.  “Blast Best Buy” won Hack Midwest’s Most Entertaining app.  This app, created by a single developer gamified the shopping experience by placing users in a first person shooter virtual world, firing at products (data pulled from the Best Buy Categories API) and breaking down their contents to provide more detailed product information. Once a product was completely blasted (aka fully explored), users were awarded points. This app brought many smiles to the audience, received a thunderous applause and was definitely a crowd pleaser.

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The Hack Midwest Best Design prize was awarded to an awesome five member team that created “Coder Coupling.” This dating app for programmers used the Yellow Pages API to provide data for possible date locations such as restaurants. It was amazing to see this app’s design evolve throughout the event which resulted in an eighties retro video game look inspired by Pac-Man.

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I want to thank Michael Gelphman and all participating volunteers at Hack Midwest for helping organize this awesome event.

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See more pictures from Hack Midwest here

Seattle Wearables Hackathon @ WeWork

Mashed by: @rexstjohn

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Last weekend (July 12th - 13th), Seattle Wearables Hackathon drew around 100 hackers, designers, developers and business people to the WeWork co-working space in the South Lake Union district of Seattle to hack together “The Next Big Thing” in wearable technology. 

Multiple members of the local hardware startup community including representatives and employees from Intel, Madrona Venture Group, Amazon, Microsoft, Expedia, Boeing and ITT were present to provide guidance and coaching to developers on technical and business problems.  Sponsors included Mashery (an Intel company), PayPal + Braintree, Strata Conference, Hadoop World and O’Reilly Media.

Seattle Wearables Hackathon was the result of planning and collaboration between several local Seattle Meetups and groups including Seattle HackathonsInternet of *BeMyAppHack ThingsSeattle Mobile Developers and SEAWear.

Below are a few select images, view the full gallery here.

Here is how it all went down.

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On day 1, the event kicked off with a rousing welcome by event organizers Hakon Verespej and Alex Day.

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Next up, participants heard pitches from Mashery and PayPal API. In the above picture yours truly explains how Mashery APIs like MapMyFitness can be used to create compelling fitness-related projects using wearable technology. 

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Justin Woo from PayPal demonstrated a fascinating integration for charging people for petting his dog (and the benefits of PayPal’s payment services and APIs).

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A number of ideas and concepts were then pitched to the audience ranging from VR, augmented reality, wearable gloves and more. image

Once the pitches were done, teams formed and the next two days were spent collaborating on a variety of technical projects in WeWork’s main open area. 

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Jigsaw Renaissance brought a hardware supply table to lend developers needed components for their projects. Above, Jigsaw representative Budi Mulyo explaining the finer points of capacitors to Joshua McBroom of Seattle Startup Weekend.

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Michael Strand of General UI built a wearable hat hack involving temperature sensors. Below are an assortment of other interesting projects underway.

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Finally, after a long night of hacking and a few last minute tweaks, the teams presented their finished prototypes.

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First up, Team oneFLEX consisting of Noah Shutty, Josh Rohas and Alex Day present their wearable glove and connected mobile phone solution leveraging Mashery’s ESPN and Rotten Tomatoes APIs.

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Mike Strand showing off his magic hat.

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Team PeePee consisting of Troy Anderson, Desiree Salgado and Fernando Hernandez (www.peepeealert.com) demonstrate a solution for triggering alerts when a diaper becomes wet. They ultimately won Pebble watches from PayPal for their use of the PayPal API.

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Ruby and Oliver from Team Flippin’ Awesome demonstrate a glove-controlled 3D printed car.

Finally, judges from PayPal and Mashery convened to discuss prizes to award for best use of Mashery and PayPal APIs. 

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Team Carify including Amyr Haq, Catherine Hubert and Jenny Chuan took home a Basis fitness tracker for their integration of Mashery API Edmunds.

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Team oneFLEX consisting of Noah Shutty, Josh Rojas and Alex Day took home a Basis fitness band for their integrations of the ESPN and Rotten Tomatoes APIs.

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 Overall this was a fantastic event, it was highly rewarding and inspirational to see the enthusiasm and talent available in the Seattle area for wearable tech! Looking forward to many future events.

 If you are interested in taking part in future events, be sure to join some of these Meetup groups: Seattle HackathonsInternet of *,Hack ThingsSeattle Mobile Developers and SEAWear.

For future IoT/wearable hackathon updates, follow @rexstjohn and @masherydev on Twitter and check out our events calendar at http://dev.mashery.com/events.

 

Mashquatch Survival Hack @ ToorCamp

Mashed by: @rexstjohn

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ToorCamp is a unique hacker camping event which occurs every other year in remote Neah Bay, Washington. As a developer evangelist, ToorCamp interested me because 1,000 or so hackers, makers, engineers and software types make the trip and I wanted to see what it was all about. While I was out there I dressed like a yeti and threw the world’s first “Mashquatch Survival Hack” to challenge these wilderness hackers to show me their best survival projects.

It was a unique experience.

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Some very creative folks show up at ToorCamp including HackerFriendly (pictured above). Last ToorCamp, he built a massive sky-laser which required 3 months to get FAA approval. This year, he focused his energy on Tesla Coils and a highly dangerous “Tesla Cannon.”

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Music is a big part of the event. Many creative music hacks and wearables were on display. In the above image, Jeff Records of OlyMega demonstrates a wearable helmet decorated with flashing lights tied to his DJ rig.

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One of the annual favorite survival hacks comes in the form of “ShadyTel.” ShadyTel is a “real” cellphone and phone network which is constructed on the fly by a group of telephony junkies. By the end of the event, the entire camp is wired for land-line calls and 2G cellphone coverage (including the bathrooms).

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Some of the survival hacks on display included a “Solar Death Ray” like the one above which proved useful for heating frozen chimichangas.

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The above survival hack involved using a radiator, a campfire, the bed of a pick up truck and a hose leading to the ocean to produce a “hot tub.”

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The pickup truck “hot tub.” Unfortunately, the tide was out so these folks had problems filling their tub.

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The Mashquatch enjoying a few minutes in the foam pit between judging survival hacks.

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Franklin Hu demonstrates his solar panel…made from other solar panels (very creative!).

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Ultimately, Franklin won the “Golden Squatch” award for the best overall survival hack for his Solar Death Ray. The Mashquatch is partial to chimichangas in general so it was a slam dunk.

ToorCamp was a real challenge to pull off but I enjoyed myself thoroughly and met numerous influential members of the maker community. 

View the full photo set here.

PayPal BattleHack Chicago

Mashed by: @chestondev

Developers gathered at the 1871 co-working space in Chicago last weekend for PayPal BattleHack.  This two day hackathon encouraged contestants to build apps helping the community.

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Mashery, along with representatives from Braintree, SendGrid, and Twilio were on-site providing developer support and awarding prizes. The Mashery prize for the Best App Using the Mashery API Network: (4) Novation Launchpad Mini USB Midi Controller for producing music.

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  I arrived at 1871 Saturday morning and was met by developers eagerly awaiting the event’s commencement.  Mashery’s Chicago-based UX Designer, Tara Devlin was amongst the attendees who contacted me interested in attending BattleHack, her first hackathon experience.  Jon Harris, Mashery’s Chicago-based sales representative also joined us interested in learning about hackathons.

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PayPal’s Jonathan LeBlanc kicked off the event welcoming participants and explained the BattleHack rules. 

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He then passed the microphone to the energetic emcee and PayPal team member, Justin Woo. Justin introduced the sponsors in a very entertaining fashion, mentioning little known facts about each sponsor’s representative. 

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My BMX stunt rider talents were revealed to the crowd before I took the stage to introduce the Mashery API Network.  The sound of a gong signaled the start of BattleHack.  Hacking continued throughout the night and into the next day.

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The Mashery prize was awarded to “Busy Kid” an app designed to help fund Chicago cleanup, after school programs, and emphasize the importance of community service.   This app used the TomTom API and was created by a four member team who drove all the way from Ohio to compete.

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Team “DWAI” won the overall 1st place award, qualifying them to compete in the BattleHack World Finals for $100,000.00.  Their winning pothole reporter app will compete against other winning BattleHack city apps from San Francisco, Miami, and other cities from around the world.

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  I want to thank the BattleHack team, especially Jonathan LeBlanc for his leadership, emcee Justin Woo for his high energy and humor, and Mindy Trinh and JoAnn Peach for managing the event.

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Thanks to Kristi Dula for providing the 1871 space for BattleHack.

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And lastly, thanks to the participating BattleHack developers for making awesome apps.

New Tech & New Experiences at Google I/O

Mashed by: @alexarcel

Last week I had the extraordinary privilege of being invited to attend Google I/O by Google’s Women Techmakers through rockstar Delyn Simons @delynator. Women Techmakers started off the action-packed next few days with a lovely dinner at five locations throughout San Francisco. I was located at Lulu’s, a warm and open venue with an open bar and delectable appetizers.  Several of the young women I met I would continue to see and get to know over the course of I/O.

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Welcome to Google I/O!

Wednesday morning started off early with the keynote and a line that wrapped the building twice! Several overflow rooms left any stragglers, myself included, nothing to worry about. The keynote was an absolute doozy and left the entire audience eager to get their hands on the new tech introduced. The Nest API and Android Smartwatches in particular caught my attention.

The Nest API was introduced as a system for the home that anticipates the needs of the residents. The Nest API sandbox had a great display of the thermostat and smoke detector designed as the flagship of the new technology. The “Nest for Developers” session Thursday afternoon was jam-packed full of interested developers, standing room only!

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The Nest API Startup Station was a lot less crowded than the full session, but no less informative! 

The session fully delved into the variety of uses and applications of the API and included examples of apps built with Mercedes, Jawbone, and more. Nest and LIFX, a WiFi enabled light bulb, presented an app with potential life saving abilities: the LIFX lights would flash between red and white in the event of a fire detected by the Nest smoke detector. While I feel that full and widespread Nest integration is still several years away, the technology looms on the horizon as a great advancement in the home.

Android wear, my personal favorite presentation of I/O, included the new OS for use on Smartwatches, two of which Google gave out as brilliant swag to every I/O attendee. Android wear is simple and sweet and heavily relies on Google’s “Cards” feature for now. The ball for this tech will really get rolling this fall with the release of Android L, but in the meantime being able to dictate texts from your wrist is a nifty and useful feature, though perhaps slightly uncomfortable to use in public.

Check out the Developer Preview for Android Wear!

LG’s G Watch and Samsung’s Gear Live were gifted to attendees while the Moto 360 will be available this fall. The Moto 360’s round face makes for a compelling shape and allows for more screen real estate, but the real battle was between the release LG and Samsung. The Gear Lives’ heart rate detector and higher resolution are appealing features, but the clunky and oversized face made it unwearable on my small wrist; for me the G Watch made for a much better fit.

Besides the sessions and the new tech Google hosted a multitude of playgrounds, workshops, and sandboxes. The “Code Lab” was one such playground; it consisted of a hub of computers that presented straightforward demos and tutorials featuring anything from Google Wallet, Chrome Apps, Polymer, and Dart, to name only a few. Find them here!

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Here are developers and Googlers hard at work at the Code Labs!

Google I/O was an amazing experience for a growing developer and I am extremely grateful for the chance to go. Seeing the next year’s technology up close and personal was inspiring and left me anticipating getting home to tackle the newly released SDKs. I can’t wait to see what comes of the tech released at this year’s Google I/O!

Apple WWDC Recap – the Application Developer Perspective

Mashed by: @aphadnis

Guest Post by: Atul Phadnis, Senior Product Manager at Intel/Mashery

This post is the 1st post in a 3-part series dedicated to the Apple World Wide Developers Conference. Be sure to check the Mashery blog in the coming weeks for the rest of the series.

For 5 days in June, I had the pleasure of attending the Apple World Wide Developers Conference held here in San Francisco and I could not be more excited about the announcements of iOS 8 and Mac OS X Yosemite, both coming this fall.

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Approximately 5000 iOS and Mac application developers descended on Moscone West to rub elbows with nearly 1500 Apple representatives to learn more about the new features and downstream customer-facing capabilities that can now be integrated with to create amazing products.

I’d like to focus my recap today on (2) of these features: App Analytics and TestFlight Beta Testing.

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App Analytics

Highlights

  • Built into the App Store and iOS 8
  • No code changes needed by Mobile App Developers
  • Deep visibility into customer lifecycle

The elite mobile app developers know that producing a great app is not the end of the journey to success; time must also be spent formulating a strategy for app distribution.

Now, with App Analytics, app developers can enjoy unprecedented visibility into the customer lifecycle and identify opportunities to satisfy new audiences that may have gone unnoticed. This great feature is built directly into iTunes Connect so existing business and development workflows can remain unchanged.

App developers should think about their downstream users as existing within this customer lifecycle funnel that consists of:

  • App Store View – “arriving on the app store page”
  • App Units – “Purchase/Download the App”
  • Active Devices – “the devices where the app running”
  • Retention – “how many actives devices are still in use after some time”
  • In-App purchase – “how are my users converting their engagement into sales?”

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Naturally this funnel is declining over time. The question one should be asking is, “how can I minimize the loss experienced as users transition from one stage in the funnel to the next?”

Developers can make use of a beautiful set of reports designed to trend these critical metrics (and more!), the sources directing traffic to your app store page, and the apps retention performance. Additionally, you can even make use of powerful filters and the option to compare metrics directly over the specified time period.

If you are serious about mobile app development on iOS, be sure to take some time out of your schedule to dive into App Analytics. You will be happy you did!

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TestFlight Beta Testing

Highlights

  • Email invitation to participate in App beta testing
  • No UDID or provisioning profile exchanges
  • Use AppleID for sign-in
  • Centralized communication via the TestFlight Mobile App

The announcement of TestFlight Beta Testing is the latest way that Apple is supporting the iOS app developer and testing community.

With TestFlight Beta Testing, app developers can now upload “builds” into iTunes Connect and invite anyone to join as a beta tester. Once the email invitation is accepted, the beta tester is asked to download the companion TestFlight mobile application where the app build can be delivered along with instructions on areas of the app to test. All downloads of builds for beta testing automatically expire after 30 days.

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Now app developers can quickly invite business executives, media representatives, and other stakeholders to use beta version of the mobile application with the ease of sending an email. Beta testers only need to use their AppleIDs to log into the beta app and the testing can begin! Feedback can be sent directly within the TestFlight companion mobile app

Developers no longer need to worry about struggling to configure a new staff member for beta testing, which previously required: (1) manually managing and exchanging UDIDs (Unique Device Identifiers), (2) installing provisioning profiles, and (3) requesting physical access to the testing devices.

This radically reduces the required steps for creating a robust testing environment to identify app performance issues and/or bugs BEFORE the app is published. This will help improve the probability of receiving a high app store rating from delighted users! 

Thanks for reading and be sure to check back for the next installment in the series!

Internet of Things Hack N’ Tell Night @ Makerhaus

Mashed by: @rexstjohn

Last night Intel and Mashery hosted our first “Internet of Things Showcase Night" organized under the “Internet of *” Meetup group and co-promoted with four other local hacker Meetups. The result? A complete blow out. We not only doubled our expected attendance but we exceeded that by another 10-15%. The goal of the event was to introduce the local hacking community to the benefits of Intel® Galileo.
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Several Intel® Galileo boards were raffled to the audience and 6 hacks were demonstrated: Three from Intel engineers from Intel Hillsboro and three from local community members. After the talk, still more hacks were demonstrated during an open mic by hobbyists who brought in their own personal projects. 
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A startup called SkyNet.im (haha) demonstrated a mind-controlled system for Machine-to-Machine communication which allows anyone to graphically build rule systems to trigger automation procedures…in this case…turning a Philips lightbulb green when someone concentrates.
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Adam Benzion, CEO of Entirely, explained the benefits of his new network for hardware startup entrepreneurs (http://www.entire.ly).
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Stewart Christie and Daniel Holmlund from Intel Hillsboro presented several Intel Galileo based hardware hacks including a cell-phone controllable game called Fwooshball.
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A local agency, Digital Kitchen, showed off the results of several hardware hacks they have built including a self-playing piano called Stanley and a successful hackathon they organized at Makerhaus last summer. Watch their amazing video of it here
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Josh Lifton demonstrated his hardware startup crowd-funding platform called Crowdsupply. Will be inviting him to talk at a brown bag sometime as well.
In summation: Seattle loves Intel! This event was a huge success and we look forwards to many more collaborations between Intel and the Seattle maker community. See the full photo set on Flickr.