Mashery Developer Blog

Curated lovingly by the Mashery Developer Outreach Team

IDF 14 @ Moscone Center: Androids, Tablets, Edisons and Tigers!

Mashed by: @rexstjohn

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Mashery attended Intel Developer Forum (IDF) 14 this past week and participated in the Ultimate MakerSpace, running a table next to 3D Systems. Our purpose? To talk about all of the great developer outreach we do around the world via our hackathon organization platform, Hacker League. We also were keen to discuss how Mashery APIs support Intel’s Internet of Things strategy and the hardware hacker community at large.

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Intel has placed a lot of emphasis on emerging technologies like Intel Edison and 3D printers like those from 3D Systems - the ultimate goal being to support the next generation of hardware startups around the world. On the first day, evangelists Cheston Cantaoi and myself (Rex St John) set up our table in the Ultimate MakerSpace. Dozens of makers and hackers stopped by to learn about Mashery and how we help developers via our extensive outreach efforts.

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Mashery was lucky enough to be located next to 3D Systems, who were displaying their most advanced new models of Cube Pro printers. 

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3D Systems also makes a smaller printer specifically targeted at home makers which were busy printing small statuettes the entire time along with blue Intel bunny-suits.

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Fresh off a major win at TechCrunch Disrupt for his team’s water conservation hack built using Intel Galileo Gen 2, evangelist Neil Mansilla spent a few hours at the booth discussing Mashery’s API management tools.

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The Ultimate MakerSpace is all about creativity, here is a pinball machine using the Intel ConnectAnything library to control a series of fans, spinning wheels and paddles.

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Other creative projects included the Makey Makey Banana Piano, a fully working musical instrument powered by fruit.

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One of the most important announcements at IDF 14 was the launch of Intel Edison, a $50 development prototyping board which includes Bluetooth LE (4.0) and Wi-Fi capabilities. Edison projects were on display all around IDF and were the “brains” behind many of the most compelling new products unveiled.

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For the first time we met Jimmy, the 3D printed robot kit from Trossen Robotics. Jimmy systems provide a consistent, Intel Edison-based, platform for robot developers.

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Trossen Robotics also sells Jimmy’s underlying frame separately from his outer shell, which can be customized for different purposes.

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SparkFun was also on site at the Ultimate MakerSpace, showing off a variety of new kits built specifically around Intel Edison.

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Intel also unveiled a brand new “Smart Dress” outfitted with electronics and 3D printed components. I was lucky enough to get a picture with the new device (and it’s wearer).

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The team from Hackerster.io including Adam Benzion and Benjamin Larralde stopped by to visit and discuss the future of hardware startups and makers.

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Intel loves Android and announced several new upcoming handsets from Samsung. I took a moment to make sure Android knew just how much we love it.

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Rick Waldron, Mashery’s next-door neighbor, spent the event tinkering with the Jigsaw Renaissance Hack-E-Bot we brought (powered by Intel Galileo Gen 2). 

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Galileo Gen 2 appeared everywhere at IDF including in this mesh computing project, also located in the Ultimate MakerSpace. 

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Towards the end of the event, Mashery’s own wonderful events team showed up including Hannah Cho, Cassandra Murray and Ariel Fish. Fun times were had.

Overall, we left IDF 14 excited about the future of Intel and the innovations on display. The Internet of Things is the future of technology and we are comfortable knowing that Intel is on the right track.   Looking forward to attending many more IDF events!

1300 Collegiate Devs Travel to Ann Arbor for MHacks

Mashed by: @chestondev

1300 collegiate developers traveled to the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor last weekend for the 4th installment of MHacks, also known as MHacks IV.  This 36 hour hackathon located in the North Campus took up several buildings including the EECS (Electrical Engineering and Computer Science), Herbert H. Dow, and the Bob Beyster Building.

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Students waited in long lines for the event to start late Friday afternoon.  Rex St. John and I represented Mashery Intel and wasted no time in meeting them.

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Instead of waiting for students to visit our table, we went to them.  We handed out Mashery stickers and pens to those in line and met developers from New York, Maryland, Wisconson, Georgia, California and more.

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We introduced to them the Mashery Challenge: Best App Using the Mashery API Network, and prize: Up to (3) Jumping Sumo Parrot Drones.  We also revealed to them the latest Intel Galileo and sensor kit and the opportunity to build with these devices. Rex announced the reward of Basis Watches for the best apps using these Galileo boards.

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The Mashery table was located in the EECS building in the designated MLH (Major League Hacking) area.  We were near registration and companies such as Sendgrid, Twilio, and PayPal.  The API Expo happened at the start of the event and gave companies an opportunity to introduce their products and accompanying prizes to participants.

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During this time, Rex educated developers and distributed the Galileo to deserving hardware hackers, while I helped developers get up and running with Mashery customer APIs and Intel XDK.  

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Veteran collegiate hackathon organizer Dave Fontenot kicked off the opening ceremonies in front of a packed auditorium.  In his opening address to MHacks IV, he stressed the importance of a welcoming collegiate hackathon community and providing opportunities for all to participate and learn.  

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Later in the evening and into the early morning, Rex and I ventured through the many classrooms providing technical support to developers building apps.

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On Saturday, projects began to form, Mashery APIs were explored, Intel XDK was installed into many laptops, and developers activated their Intel Galileos.  

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Shortly after dinner, representatives from MLH featured a very fun and challenging game for participants.  

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Contestants were given only minutes to duplicate via coding, a displayed web page. The catch: they were forbidden to see the visual output of their code, which was only revealed to spectators after time expired.  The code results drew much laughter from the crowd with ridiculous visual differences from the original web page display.  

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MLH Commissioner, Swift, judged the projects with an A to F grading scale.  Few developers earned the A grade. 

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Michigan governor Rick Snyder visited MHacks Sunday morning showing his support for collegiate developers.  He walked the hallways with MHacks organizers and visited a few selected teams including the Jupiter team which used the Intel Galileo for their sound recognizer app. Both Rex and I met briefly with Governor Snyder and expressed our gratitude for his support of the developer community.

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Buses transported hackathon participants to the award ceremonies at Rackham Auditorium Sunday afternoon.  The Mashery prize was awarded to an amazing four member team who invoked the services of the USA Today API and created “Stockular.”  

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This financial app provides S&P 500 company data from news related webpages including USA Today. The team also used the Oculus Rift headset to display graphs and real time stock quotes in a 3D environment.

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I want to thanks my Mashery partner Rex St. John for his incredible hardware support to developers.  Special thanks goes out to Jamie Sookprasong and the entire MHacks team of voluteers for organizing this awesome event.

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Apple announces Apple Watch, iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus

Mashed by: @aphadnis

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"What time is it?" may never be answered the same way again.

Today, at the Flint Center in Cupertino, CA, Apple unveiled an innovative wearable device called the Apple Watch along with the newest iPhone design, the iPhone 6.

The Apple Watch

Apple’s entry into the wearable’s product category delivers a dynamic Retina display interface paired with eye-catching design aesthetics to redefine the notion of a “comprehensive health and fitness device.”

The Apple Watch is priced at $349 and will be available sometime in early 2015 in an assortment of finishes, sizes, and with interchangeable wrist straps.

"the most personal device Apple has ever created" - Tim Cook, CEO of Apple Inc. discussing the Apple Watch

The Apple Watch can be personalized further using the assortment of visually engaging watch faces that users can select from. (I cannot express just how much nostalgia I felt when I saw the Mickey Mouse watch face! Very cool!)

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WatchKit

Developers can use the related WatchKit software development kit (SDK) to create applications specifically tailored for delivering interactive experiences using the combination of on-board sensors, connectivity, and integrated haptic feedback system.

Building on the design cues of the newest iOS operating system, iOS 8, the Apple Watch will support:

  • Glances: for user to receive and swipe through information efficiently
  • Actionable Notifications: for users to receive rich native and 3rd-party notifications with contextually relevant responses
  • WatchKit Apps: for light interaction with content specifically tailored to the wearable touch screen and Digital Crown wheel interface to “zoom and scroll nimbly and precisely, without obstructing your view.” The Digital Crown will also serve as the Home button.

Apple has not yet shared when the WatchKit SDK will be made available for developers.

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Activity App and Workout App

Tim Cook expressed that the Apple Watch “is the most personal device Apple has ever created” and that sentiment is reflected in the care and design of the device and the included Activity and Workout applications.

The Activity app provides a quantitative assessment of the number of minutes per day that can be categorized as Move, Exercise, or Stand. Ring graphs allow for speedy comparison between days.

The Workout app seeks to assist users in achieving their desired personal fitness level using:

  • Goals: workouts suggested and “personalized by the application based on your workout history”
  • Reminders: motivational notifications tailored to your workout activity
  • Achievements: a collection of fitness milestones that are earned and celebrated

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iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus

Apple also announced the September 19th, 2014 launch date of the next-generation iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus.

The large 4.7-inch and 5.5-inch respective diagonal screens are indicative of the shift of media consumption platforms as mobile devices are making the transition from secondary to primary viewing screens. “Dual-domain pixels” will allow for wider viewing angles and, hopefully, a more comfortable viewing experience.

Both models contain a new Barometer sensor that developers can use for analyzing relative air pressure. “Focus Pixels” implements a technique called “phase detection auto focus” to ensure swift auto-focus capabilities for users to enjoy while creating photos or 1080p high-definition video. An upgraded lens and optical image stabilization system is only available for the iPhone 6 Plus model.

Pre-orders begin on September 12th, 2014.

Additionally, iOS 8 will be available for download on September 17th, 2014.

PayPal’s BattleHack, Boston was a lot of fun. Congratulations Team Raffle: Winner of best app built using Mashery API Network with @sharethis API

Geek Girls Carrots Maker Party @ Seattle Central Library

Mashed by: @rexstjohn

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Geek Girls Carrots is a collective “get together and make fun things" group focusing on women in STEM originating from Poland and, more recently, spreading to Seattle via event organizer Kamila Stepniowski. 

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Having run into Kamila on numerous occasions around the Seattle maker and hacker community, I was lucky enough to be invited to attend their very first Maker Party event hosted in the Seattle Central Library. Seeing as Intel (Mashery’s parent company) is deeply involved in the maker-community, I brought along a stack of Intel Galileo boards.

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Overall attendance was around 50 local makers and hackers as well as representatives from the Seattle Pacific Science Center and the Jigsaw Renaissance maker space.

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Aside from giving a 7-minute lightning talk, I ran a small “Mashery Challenge” to encourage developers to answer tricky API questions in order to win two Intel Galileo boards. I also manned a table with Galileo boards to discuss the possibilities between Mashery APIs and IOT devices. Some of the APIs I demonstrated included JamBase and Rotten Tomatoes with Node.js.

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Jigsaw Renaissance ran a workshop teaching kids how to build robots using Lego Mindstorms. Budi and his collaborator Richard from Hack-E-Bot have done a fantastic job making technology approachable to kids by creating a teachable robot kit.

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On the second day, people showed off their Hack-E-Bot creations.

imageThe challenge was a success with 17 participants creating around 20 different applications using APIs from Beats, USA Today and JamBase. Budi Mulyo from Jigsaw Renaissance and Sarah Guermond both took home Intel Galileo prototyping boards. 

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While Geek Girls Carrots is a new group to the Seattle region, they are off to a great start and I always enjoy seeing the local community turn up to build fun “stuff” together!

Another Summer of Internship Fun: Wrangling Alpacas and Shaping Schemas

Mashed by: @alexarcel

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So that time has come around again. Time to put up inner tubes and kayaks, shove camping gear into the closet and as for me, I pack up my room and say goodbye to not-so-sunny San Francisco.  The end of summer has arrived, and with it the end of my super-cool-awesome internship at Intel Mashery. It’s been a blast, but again I say goodbye to the illustrious DevO (Developer Outreach) team and leave with a plethora of new experience and knowledge. 

Last summer I spent my time spiffing up the I/O Docs Community Edition, adding support for HTML tags and OAuth 2.0 and updating to Express 3. I also got to try my hand at Intel’s XDK and made a few demo apps. I learned a lot and had so much fun that June 1 saw me packing my bags and heading to San Francisco for another summer at the Mashery office!

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Alex (that’s me) and Neil (@mansilladev) kicking off the Alpaca integration project.

Summer of Open Source: Part 2
This summer I tackled I/O Docs head-on with a new mission and harder challenge in mind: implementing a new schema and taming an alpaca! The alpaca I refer to is of course alpaca.js, a JQuery-based form generator that is packed full of useful and handy tools that the I/O Docs Community Edition was thirsting for. Between implementing this helpful library and bringing in a new schema, I had a busy and fulfilling summer on Mashery’s developer platform team!

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Days later: heavy schema and template contemplation.

The New Schema
The most notable feature added to the I/O Docs Community Edition this summer is undoubtedly the schema update. I/O Docs renders the API information that is contained in the schema; having an understandable and consistent schema is important for users and ease of use. The I/O Docs Enterprise Edition (the one bundled with Mashery’s SaaS portal product) already supported a solid schema that resembles a bit of Google Discovery Document format and JSON schema.. and now the Community Edition has now been updated to accept this schema. Instead of the clunky organization of method-level information in one JSON file and high level API information (auth, base URIs, etc.) in another, all API info is now stored in one JSON file. Variable names have been altered to reflect familiar and easy to understand standards, and the new JSON file composition follows proper JSON formatting. These changes vastly improve I/O Doc’s schema but maintain a familiar structure for easy migration from the now deprecated version.

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Many days later: sporting the hoodies of focus and concentration.

A new object in the schema is “schemas,” an object that contains any request body methods and/or parameters that can be referenced elsewhere in the schema. Both request bodies and references are new features added this summer. Parameters can be referred to in the schemas via a lone “$ref”: “paramName” element in an object. The JSON configuration files have been updated, so you have plenty of examples to follow.

The big updates here improve request body capabilities, long sought after by the open source I/O Docs community. Now parameters or references to parameters can be placed into a “request” object within a method. The parameters placed here will be sent in the request body when a request is made. PUT/POST call request bodies are now ready for action!

In addition, several new types have been added to the I/O Docs Community Edition. Arrays and objects are now a type option when making a POST or PUT call and are quick and easy to set up in the updated schema. There are several examples on the I/O Docs Github site. Because we’ve implemented Alpaca, which supports JSON schema types, you can expect some of our future revs to involved support for these types, including validation!

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Commit and push. Full on Alpaca integration / transformation!

The Alpaca
So, a little bit more on Alpaca. This alpaca.js library is JQuery-based form renderer, supporting fairly complex templating, schema parsing and input validation. While it is not very versatile or easy to use in custom UIs, the tools it brings to the table in form generation are exemplary. Most of my summer was spent tackling this library, and I will remember it fondly. 

The new and improved I/O Docs Community Edition is indeed a new version, and ready for the platform community to put it through it’s paces. It is jam-packed full of features that members of the community have been asking for, and their requests have been acknowledged and answered! The platform/developer community has been great in giving suggestions and pull requests, and this project would not exist without them.

Farewell!
It’s been a great run and great work this summer and I’ll miss it here at Intel Mashery dearly. Living in San Francisco has been a blast and it would not have been the same without the DevO team. It’s been a privilege and a wonderful ride. I’ll miss everyone as I head back to finish school. Thank you so much!

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Delyn (@delynator), Putin (the tiger), myself (@alexarcel) and Sarah-Jane (@sarahjanemorris)

Seattle API Meetup: Ten Reasons Developers Hate Your API

Mashed by: @rexstjohn

When I first started out as Developer Evangelist for Mashery in Seattle it became clear that there was strong demand for an API Meetup yet none existed….so I started one

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Our first talk was presented by John Musser of API Science who gave his acclaimed talk “Ten Reasons Developers Hate Your API.” Attendance was strong and we completely filled the 40-person event space.

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Developers and API architects from several large local companies including Concur, Microsoft and Amazon were in attendance. Looking forward to more succesful API Meetups in Seattle!

Hooking Up with GovHack Down Under

Mashed by: @masheryoz

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On a recent July weekend Mashery took part in what has become an iconic Big Data event in Australia. Over 2 days 1200 hackers in 11 cities across 3 time zones took part, generating hundreds of new ideas to improve life for everyday Australians.

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Welcome to GovHack 2014, quite possibly the largest hackathon in Australian history.
In 2010 the Australian Government declared that:
To promote greater participation in Australia’s democracy, it is committed to open government based on a culture of engagement, built on better access to and use of government held information, and sustained by the innovative use of technology.
From that the Australian Gov 2.0 initiative was born, and in each year since the annual GovHack event has become a catalyst to push more government agencies to release more open data in order to live up to that promise. The event also presents a unique forum for local developers to work with some incredibly rich Australian data sets, which have inspired some amazing new mashups aimed at solving community problems or making government more effective.
Mashery was proud to be a GovHack partner this year. But in addition to attending and handing out awards, we felt we could do more to help attract attendees to the event. The hackathon scene in Australia is pretty nascent compared to the US and Europe, and good hack events can be very hard to find outside of Sydney or Melbourne. So it was a given that a national event like GovHack was going to need to attract first time hackers, especially in regional areas. In order to help get some of the less experienced developers comfortable with hacking APIs - something they would no doubt have to tackle during the event - we put an Aussie twist on an old favorite: The Mashery Challenge. 
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For the first time we ran the challenge as a week long competition online before the event started, administered via Twitter, as a way to encourage Australian developers to think about mashing stuff together while operating under the pressure of a real competition. The jockeying for leaderboard position was intense, with the #1 spot changing over multiple times throughout the week. Not many managed to make it through all the way to the end, but those who persevered were definitely rewarded with the satisfaction of solving some of the hardest puzzles we’ve ever come up with.
When it finally came time to kick off the big event, Mashery was ready to represent! Veteran evangelist @MansillaDev braved a 15 hour flight and even managed to put aside his pathological fear of the deadly Drop Bear to join me down under, where we attended the Melbourne and Canberra events and met a bunch of amazingly inventive and creative teams. 
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Photo by Jordan Wilson-Otto / CC BY

@MansillaDev and @jadacormier at GovHack Melbourne. I’m pretty sure this was Neil about to Google all the things that can kill you in Australia. He didn’t go outside after that.
It may have been run in 11 different cities, but regular video linkups and a constant stream of Twitter updates and jokes helped to ensure there was a sense of collaboration and shared experience between everyone, even if they were on opposite sides of the continent in Perth or Brisbane (only 4000 KM apart, or a quick 47 hour drive through the Outback…)
imagePhoto by Sharen / CC BY
imagePhoto by Jordan Otto-Wilson / CC BY

imagePhoto by Jordan Otto-Wilson / CC BY

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Photo by Brett James / CC BY
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Photo by GovHack Perth / CC BY
It was two super intense days, and in the end over 200 teams created mashups and prototypes. All of which are listed for public viewing and voting.
Some of our favorites included:

'What is Gov (Baby don't hurt me)' which not only wins BEST PROJECT NAME EVER because I know for a fact that it’s in your head now too BUT also happens to be a completely engaging and charming party game that shows how government actually operates. Cut through that red tape to win!

One of the prettier entries, this is a beautifully designed city dashboard for Melbourne residents to see what is happening right now around their city. Video also includes a completely unintentional OK GO homage, so they got that going for them.

Some incredibly poised and impressive year 9 students who created an app to optimize the use of public infrastructure like sports venues, BBQs, and playgrounds. 
Crunching the numbers to prove that immigrants who come to Australia contribute significantly to the overall value of society. Not just a huge hot political issue at the moment, but a truly admirable objective to try and use government data to dispel some of the myths that persist in society today.
So with $70K in prizes up for grabs, which projects took home the awards? Mashery was proud to sponsor the Spirit of GovHack award, which was provided to the team in each city that best exemplified the spirit of GovHack. 
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Spirit of GovHack Canberra winner @MatthewPurcell accepting his award graciously, without mentioning my mysterious phase shifting hand.


But that was only the first round of prizes. The best of various category prizes, and best overall is still to be decided. With so many entries to evaluate that’s going to take some time! But announcements are coming soon. GovHack organizers have a gala red carpet event planned for Aug 10 in which finalists are invited to attend, rub shoulders with the data custodians, and find out who will be the 2014 GovHack champions. 

Hacking for a Cause in LA at the Causathon

Mashed by: @chestondev

Developers teamed with non-profit organizations to create impactful technology solutions last weekend at the Causathon Hack for a Cause hackathon in Santa Monica, CA held at General Assembly. This 24 hour hackathon was organized by Brand Knew, the creative agency and technology accelerator.  

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Brand Knew’s Zach Suchin welcomed attendees and introduced the eleven non-profit organizations during Saturday’s opening ceremonies.  Developer teams were then announced out of a drawing to select their preferred organization for collaboration.

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Once all teams were matched, a huge countdown clock appeared and hacking began. Sponsors were on-site helping developers and awarding prizes.  The prize for the best app using the Mashery API Network: up to (3) Acer 720 Chromebooks.

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After the opening ceremonies, I presented my workshop, “How to Build a Mobile App with the Mashery API Network.” I called on a volunteer, an IOS native developer, to help me build the new Beats Music HTML5 app in Intel XDK.  With my direction, he registered for a Mashery account, obtained his Beats Music API key, made an API call using Beats Music Playground, and built the Beats Music app in Intel XDK. This demonstration was completed in just minutes in front of an audience.

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I also assisted participants with Hacker League, the hackathon management tool used by Causathon, which included help with team formation and design techniques using Hacker League templates. Descriptions of Causathon projects with nicely crafted app screenshots can be found here on Hacker League

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Contestants worked on their non-profit organization apps, and raffle prizes for participants were announced and awarded throughout the night and into the next day.

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The Mashery prize was awarded to the awesome five member team that created “HEART-IT.”

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This penpal app allows users to share photos and e-collages with friends, and send messages to other users and build friendships around the world. The Beats Music and Rotten Tomatoes API were used in this app for users to share their music and movie interest with friends. This team paired with Children Mending Hearts, an organization dedicated to empowering disadvantaged youth through educational and art programs that build empathy and global citizenry.

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I want to thank Russell Meyerowitz and the Brand Knew team for organizing this awesome event.  And thanks to all the participating LA developers and volunteers.

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The Summer of Hacker League

Mashed by: @ajotwani

“Say no to everything, so you can say yes to the one thing.” ~ Richie Norton

With a product like Hacker League that’s loved and used everyday by developers, to hackathon organizers, to just plain hackathon enthusiasts, we’ve been taking a closer look at exactly what would really make the experience better for our Hacker League community.

With Swift’s help, we dug into the Hacker League infrastructure, explored its nooks and crannies, and mapped out what we need to do in the next few months to improve the performance and user experience.

But what’s really cool is that we’ve pulled together some amazing talent to get to work on Hacker League. Today, I would like to share some of the things that we’ve been working on.

Here’s what we’ve been up to

The message we heard loud and clear from the community back when we took over Hacker League was - “Hacker League is awesome; don’t screw it up with a million unnecessary features.” So instead of adding unnecessary features, we’ve spent most of our time simplifying the existing features and improving the usability.

  1. Make the Hackathons page load faster: We’ve rolled out a faster & improved performance of the Hackathons list page, making it easier to quickly find the hackathon you’re looking for.
  2. Make it easier to add a Location to my hackathon: A new redesigned Address/Locaton selector for the “Create new Hackathon" page. It uses the Google Maps API to provide suggested Address, City, State, and Country Suggestions as you type, making it faster for you to create your hackathon and ensuring that the location is in a standard format, making it easier to search and discover.
  3. Give me a Visual Map to help interested developers locate my hackathon: A Map with the chosen address plotted on it is then displayed, assuring organizers that users will be able to find directions using Google Maps.
  4. Make it easier for me to sort/arrange the wiki pages for my hackathon: Ability to reorder/arrange the wiki links on the left side bar. The wiki links on the hackathon details page are now sorted alphabetically, instead of creation date. You can now control the order of the wiki pages simply by adding a page order number in front of the wiki name. This will ensure that they are arranged in the order you want, not the order you may have created them in.
  5. Video embeds - The Hacker League wiki pages now support video embeds, so you can now include YouTube/Vimeo videos right into the wiki itself.
  6. Help me make my hackathon pages look pretty: Introducing Hacker League Markdown Templates. Ready to be used Markdown templates for Overview, Schedule, Location & other popular pages you as an organizer might need to create for your hackathon. All available here on GitHub.
  7. Add Support for BitBucket: You now have a choice to include a link to your GitHub or BitBucket repos on your user profile page.
  8. I want to throw a private, internal hackathon: Hacker League Enterprise is now being used by Intel customers. General Electric used Hacker League Enterprise to run their recent in May at their GE Software headquarters in Northern California.
  9. Plenty of bugs, annoyances, and enhancements (thanks to those of you who posted them on UserVoice)

What’s next

Among many requests we received from you, these two stood out pretty distinctly, and will be rolling out shortly -

  1. Refresh the website design for Hacker League. Make it beautiful and more functional, without losing the simplicity.
  2. Easily search for hackathons by name and location.

This is just a start. We plan to do a ton of work on Hacker League over the next few months. We’re also tapping the expertise of people across Mashery with skills in design, user experience, and front-end web interfaces. With their help, we’re going to build a better Hacker League.

We’re listening

We want to know what new features you’d like, what current features need tweaking, or whatever you’d like to share. If you have ideas, thoughts, suggestions, and requests, we’d be grateful if you’d put them into writing and drop us a note at feedback [at] hackerleague [dot] org, or tweet us at @hackerleague.

We will do our best to keep you well-informed, seek your feedback, and make Hacker League better than it was before. Stay tuned for what’s next, and please keep the feedback coming.

Amit Jotwani (@amit)

Hacker League Community Guy & Front End Developer